why toastmasters?

One of the wonders of our networked world has been the democratisation of speech. But as with anything gratis you […]

One of the wonders of our networked world has been the democratisation of speech. But as with anything gratis you get what you don’t pay for; terabytes of inanity. British students might be gnashing their teeth over the price of a degree but most every one of them – and their recently graduated newly unemployable media studies BBC-wannabee buddies – clearly has an Apple slush fund. And the smart matte mac has to do something. Cue, generation-Harry Potter and a lot of hogwash. No-one has to read the tripe spewing forth from their interminate chiclet-bashing but there is a definite sense of enslavement to the process or mechanism of communicating rather than a genuine motivation to educate and inspire. A kind of ‘because it’s there’ phenomenon. The relentless self-promotion of social networking’s core Gen-Y demographic is evident in a cloud of – sometimes anonymised but more often guileless – vacuous narcissism. Sooner or later though even Gen-Y has to stand behind what it says and say it to an audience with a face. Social networking encourages quantity-over-quality and so a whole generation has grown up with an propensity to intractable politically correct verbal diarrhoea. Flame and flee won’t get you far in the real world. My advice to Gen-Y based onĀ  job candidates I’ve seen would be to put themselves out there, stand up in front of an audience and realise that to get a message across effectively, concisely and powerfully requires structure, charisma and guts. Toastmasters is but one route to achieve this aim.

 

About sgtohk

Living in Hong Kong... a Brit... via Singapore